13. Star Wars (1977)

Luke Skywalker joins forces with a Jedi Knight, a cocky pilot, a Wookiee and two droids to save the galaxy from the Empire’s world-destroying battle station, while also attempting to rescue Princess Leia from the mysterious Darth Vader. I don’t think I’ve ever watched this film from the angle of evaluating it, cinematically.  Now, I’ve watched it a number of times, of course, because I … Continue reading 13. Star Wars (1977)

15. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

The Monoliths push humanity to reach for the stars; after their discovery in Africa generations ago, the mysterious objects lead mankind on an awesome journey to Jupiter, with the help of H.A.L. 9000: the world’s greatest supercomputer. Alright. I’m going to be honest with you: it had been a hot minute since I last watched this film. Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, although undeniably … Continue reading 15. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

16. Sunset Blvd. (1950)

A screenwriter develops a dangerous relationship with a faded film star determined to make a triumphant return. Sunset Blvd marks Billy Wilder’s fourth appearance on the American Film Institute’s “100 Greatest Films” list, and rightfully so. I’ve argued repeatedly that there are too many Western’s on this list, but I would also argue that there’s never enough Billy Wilder. That man, time and time again, … Continue reading 16. Sunset Blvd. (1950)

18. The General (1926)

After being rejected by the Confederate military, not realizing it was due to his crucial civilian role, an engineer must single-handedly recapture his beloved locomotive after it is seized by Union spies and return it through enemy lines. You know what’s funny? Every single synopsis that I’ve read for Buster Keaton’s 1926 film The General has put emphasis on the civil war aspect of the film. And, … Continue reading 18. The General (1926)

19. On the Waterfront (1954)

An ex-prize fighter turned New Jersey longshoreman struggles to stand up to his corrupt union bosses, including his older brother, as he starts to connect with the grieving sister of one of the syndicate’s victims. I tell you what, we just don’t get the same cattiness from filmmakers like we did in the 50s and 60s. Elia Kazan made On the Waterfront as a direct response … Continue reading 19. On the Waterfront (1954)